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Top Unusual Sports To Try in Sheffield

February 2, 2016 in Children & Play, Families & Children, Health & Fitness, Latest Articles, News, Opportunities, Sport, Uncategorized, Women

Sheffield is a sporting city. Some of us see the Olympic legacy working here, some don’t. It’s hard to ignore the rise in sporting opportunities for young people and children across the city and there’s lots going off within the universities and colleges. However, outside of educational establishments, some of us, usually parents with careers, children and heavy financial responsibilities, struggle to fit sport into our working week.

If you want to get back  into a sport of some sort – perhaps now the children are at school and you have more ‘free time,’ you might want to give some of the more unusual and fun sporting activities a try to really boost your confidence and bring some adolescent, free-feeling fun back into your life.

 

Here’s our list of new things to try this year:

 

Roller Derby

There’s a big team for women age 16+ in Sheffield called the Sheffield Steel Rollergirls. They’ve just started recruiting for new members and although you have to apply for the kit as to buy your own can be expensive, this sport looks to be growing hugely in popularity across Sheffield. The sport comprises of wearing roller skates – yes, not roller blades and lots of protection including a helmet, arms and knee pads. Videos and information can be found on their website: SHEFFIELD STEEL ROLLERGIRLS They also have a big Facebook page and are all over other social media channels, also on FunMeFit as a member.

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Baseball

Although it’s not Baseball season yet, Sheffield’s own Bladerunners have weekly training sessions. We’ve all heard of the American sport but have you ever tried it? There’s very little to fork out for apart from subs of a few quid a session and it’s great fun in the great outdoors that Sheffield is blessed with. The season starts in April 2016 and updated information and contact numbers can be found on their website: SHEFFIELD BLADERUNNERS. They are also on Facebook and you can find their profile on FunMeFit too.

bladerunners

Kickboxing

We’ve all heard of kickboxing and probably associate it with big blokes kicking the crap out of each other in a ring. These days, it’s a growing women’s sport and a great way to keep fit and tone those wobbly bits. Powers Martial Arts Centre in Stannington is a city leader in its friendly, approachable and well-equipped gym. Offering classes, 1-2-1 sessions, group sessions, family sessions, children’s classes – you name it, they can offer it. They even do safety training and self-defence classes to help local women stay safe. It’s best to catch them on Facebook at POWERS MARTIAL ARTS CENTRE.

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Bouldering

No ropes, no fuss, just climbing up a rock with only yourself to rely on. Luckily for Sheffielders, there are a number of centres around Sheffield offering safer bouldering opportunities than tackling Stanage Edge. The Works in Sheffield is one of the largest bouldering centres in the world – it has everything you’d need to really explore this sport. Not only does bouldering work on just about every muscle in your body, it keeps you slim and keeps your mind active with problem solving tasks. It’s a great all-rounder for any age or ability. With the Mini Works for little ones where parents and children can climb together, there are no excuses. They also run courses and children’s classes. See THE WORKS website.

climbing-works-logo

 

If you’d like to stay updated about any new sporting opportunities across the city and further afield, check out our Facebook Page and send us your ideas, photos or events and we are always happy to share.

Business Training & Wellness Packages

August 27, 2015 in Community Issues, Education, Health & Fitness, Latest Articles, News, Nutrition, Opportunities, Sport, Uncategorized, Women

Get Your Workplace Motivated & Up-Skilled

Benefiting Your Business

Whatever your industry or sector, there are risks associated. Whether those risks are direct safety hazards i.e. working in front-line public services or indirect health hazards i.e. your workforce spend hours sat at a desks, staring at their computer screens, there are effective, low-cost methods to ensure you and your workforce stay healthier, happier and confident in their abilities.

 

Who We Are

FunMeFit Ltd have been a community-led, health/wellness-focused business for over 3 years. Our main aim has been to promote the services and activities offered by local and national sports clubs, organisations and businesses through our popular network and directory www.funmefit.com. We have been successful in building an extensive list of trusted, qualified connections in the health and wellness, sports, fitness and safety industries and are ready to use these links to assist other businesses with sourcing staff development, training and wellness programmes.

 

What We Offer

Quite simply, we offer a no-nonsense approach for businesses who want to find something to motivate, up-skill or develop their staff. We take the hassle out of your search to find a training provider, motivator, activity provider or key speaker who is right for your business. We listen to your needs, make suggestions, find the right provider, ask for a quote from providers, we add our commission fee (10% of overall cost) and we create a bespoke package according to what you’ve asked for.

We can find low-cost, no fuss solutions to your business needs including:

  • Staff Training – from personal safety to motivation training.

  • Key Speakers – from sports people to business professionals.

  • Team-Building – survival training, corporate fitness, activities and sports.

  • Courses – for staff young and older in confidence, public speaking, management etc.

  • Events – providing and making suggestions for your events i.e. activity providers, sports people, speeches, catering and much more.

 

Our fees

We don’t charge you a penny for our services. We take a commission from the activity providers/key speakers who we will ask for a quote from for your needs.

 

Contact us:

For more information or to contact us to discuss your needs, e-mail Kate or Andy at: info@funmefit.com.

 

For activity providers who want to join our list of contacts and promote their services as part of our network, please register your company/club at www.funmefit.com/register or e-mail us on the above for more information.

 

We look forward to hearing from you.

 

 

Small Sparks Funding Opportunity

December 5, 2014 in Community Issues, Latest Articles, News, Opportunities, Uncategorized, Women

Our friends at Move More in Sheffield have sent us a funding opportunity for our members who are eligible. A small helping hand towards costs for those of you who are really helping people lift barriers and get active.

move more logo

“I would like to inform you of an exciting opportunity for groups and organisations who are committed to helping communities Move More. We have some small pots of funding available (£300) to help people lift any barriers to promoting physical activity (e.g., promoting sport to females) or  to create more opportunities to help people engage with physical activity.

Please visit the website for further information http://bit.ly/1yJsFLi. Closing date for applications is 20th Feb, 2015 but money must be spent by the end of March, 2014,” Dr Sarah Scott, Move More Officer.

If you want more information, we can send you the criteria and application form or you can use the link above to go straight to the Move More website.

 

‘Taylored’ running, as reviewed by a novice…

September 12, 2014 in Community Issues, Health & Fitness, Latest Articles, News, Sport, Women

If running is not your thing, meet Adam Taylor and you’ll change your mind. We all hear about the benefits of running and working the legs hard – weight loss, flat stomach, good for practically everything…it’s a great idea in principle.

For many of us however, it requires a LOT of effort and self-motivation to be able to get out of the house and prepare ourselves for what lay ahead – a run.

 

Adam Taylor with a client.

Adam Taylor with a client. Source: Website

Kate from FunMeFit gave Taylored Running a go…

 

“I’m not going to lie, I’ve struggled with self-motivation and discipline when I’ve finally got the kids to sleep of an evening. Everyday, I think, today, I’ll make time to go for a run and stop eating chocolate. The idea deludes me into thinking that I am fitter than I actually am. At least I’m ‘thinking’ about running…

When FunMeFit member and supporter, Adam Taylor of Taylored Personal Training and Running Groups, Sheffield asked if I wanted to go out for a run, I said, casually, “yes, that would be great.” To my surprise, I found a spare hour of one day and decided to actually take him up on the offer.

Adam met me with a big smile and despite us only having met previously on social media; I was re-assured by his calm and friendly nature – I’ve heard a lot of people discussing how they feel scared by some Personal Trainers with the bully-bootcamp ethos. This couldn’t have been further from Adam’s reassuring attitude.

We started jogging almost straight away – I was looking forward to a steady mile or so through the beautiful Endcliffe Park, Sheffield. At my steady jogging pace, we discussed how we both enjoyed keeping people active; we discussed how children keep you active, how there is such little time to actually ‘exercise’ on your own with children and whether or not parents can use the excuse for non-exercise on having children around.

Adam said I could walk whenever I needed to so after 10 minutes, I took him up on that offer – a bit of stitch, a bit of nervous exhaustion and randomly, a bit of headache. After 5 minutes of easy walking and more chatting, he suggested we run again – I really didn’t want to appear weak or incapable so I agreed.

After this, I seemed to move my thoughts away from the effort of actually running and concentrate on the trail we were running along, my breathing (as often through your nose as possible, according to Adam, aids running), the sounds and the conversation. It felt really liberating compared to being stuck in a house or an office in front of a computer.

If out on my own running, I would normally have stopped at the first hurdle – the stitch and headache. I’d have walked home with the satisfaction of at least ‘doing my bit.’

However, when you have someone to reassure you that you’re actually fitter than you thought and telling you how easy it is to build your stamina for running if you do it regularly, it’s amazing how much further your body can continue.

Before I knew it, I had run 6km with only 3 walking periods in total (less than 5 minutes each). Adam, had recorded the journey on his special watch-thingy and I was thrilled but exhausted at the same time. When we got back to the ‘adult playground’ in Endcliffe Park, he took a piece of equipment from his bag (yes, there are special bags just for running), it looked like a large material belt with handles at each end. It was for looping over the pull-up bars and for stretching muscles on.

I thought I’d be aching for days after the run but with just a few short stretches and a bit of a cool down, I felt great; starving, but great.

Adam made the run feel like less effort than when I go running alone. It made such a difference to have a knowledgeable, supportive trainer with me. I’d actually had fun. I’d pushed my boundaries, combated the fear of running past my comfort zone and had dared to run until I was truly exhausted – we’d only been out for an hour!

Strangely, I had more energy that day to play with the children (I have a 2 and a 3 year old). My mind was working more efficiently, I felt positive and like I’d achieved something major.

I know that there are people who run every day and those who won’t even entertain the thought, but as a distance-running novice, I would definitely recommend experiencing running with Adam.

I’m addicted now; I want to run all the time. I have learned that giving up straight away isn’t always the best thing to do and that making an extra effort is worth it! It doesn’t matter who you are, what your weight, what your ability, what your circumstances, if you have the support from a knowledgeable professional like Adam, you can achieve anything.”

E-mail: adam@taylored-personal-training.co.uk
Website: http://taylored-personal-training.co.uk/
Tel: 07837 544 845

‘Tis the Season to be SAD!

December 5, 2013 in Community Issues, Families & Children, Health & Fitness, Latest Articles, News, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Women

Christmas is a time of year many people associate with plump turkeys, presents overflowing beneath a bauble-studded Christmas tree and children/domesticated animals gambolling around a quaint family home. Other people may think of it as a time where we consume a bit too much sherry, definitely too much rich food and suffer the familiar family dispute (or two).

However, this time of year people are also prone to suffering SAD. This acronym refers to Seasonal Affective Disorder, which is a hotly disputed topic but one which, if you suffer from it, is all too real. According to NHS Choices, it is defined as ‘a type of depression that has a seasonal pattern. The episodes of depression tend to occur at the same time each year, usually during the winter.’ The symptoms of SAD are:

  • Low mood
  • Lack of interest in things you normally enjoy
  • Being less active than normal
  • Sleeping more

This ‘winter depression’ usually begins to rear its head just as the days are getting shorter – when the sky is dark as you leave school or work – and intensifies to a peak during December, January and February. Severity can range from mild to severe. All symptoms tend to lift as spring blooms.

There are several reasons why people might suffer from SAD but the most typical ones, psychologists and scientists surmise, is lack of exposure to sunlight and the effect on hormonal activity. Absorption of sunlight is a core process in the manufacture of the hormone, serotonin, which the body uses to stabilise mood. Sunlight also affects the production of melatonin, which tells your body to feel sleepy, as well as the body’s circadian rhythm, which is responsible for regulating biological processes like sleep.

All in all, SAD is thought to be a type of depression that is often easily treatable using particular methods –numerous studies have shown that light therapy (using a lightbox that mimics the light of the sun) have been successful in alleviating SAD. These are professional treatments and it is always best to speak to a doctor if you think you might need help.

If you only feel mildly blue, you can also boost your mood by doing fun things associated with winter, like toasting marshmallows, going ice-skating or cuddling up with a good book by the fire.

Exercise is one of the most effective ways to boost mood. We here at FunMeFit never tire of extolling the virtues of exercise, even though it might seem like the last thing you want to do in the depths of winter. Here are five exercise tips to help you stay positive as Christmas’s fun and demands descend upon us:

  • Go for a brisk walk with a friend or family member in the crisp winter air: you will see vibrant colours and dazzling skies that only appear at this time of year;
  • It may seem absurd, but going for a run in the cold (make sure you go during daylight and the ground isn’t too slippery!) is invigorating;
  • Invest in a yoga mat and do some indoor yoga – there are plenty of good videos online and this stress-relieving activity is completely free;
  • Go tobogganing with your friends or family in the snow – if past years are anything to judge by, it may well be a white Christmas! And,
  • If you have any old sports equipment or games that you no longer use, take them to a charity shop so someone else can use it. Clearing out the clutter is always a mood-lifter and so is helping others!

It’s important to visit your GP if you suspect you might be suffering from SAD to get a clear diagnosis from a health professional. Even if you feel perfectly chipper throughout these shorter, colder days, exercise is still an integral feature for a fun, active lifestyle. Try one of the tips this weekend and you could feel even better. Happy holidays, everyone!

By Catherine Heath

Girls Don’t Do Sport

August 25, 2013 in Children & Play, Community Issues, Education, Families & Children, Health & Fitness, Latest Articles, News, Opportunities, Sport, Women

Taken from our funmefit WordPress blog: http://funmefit.wordpress.com/2013/08/25/girls-dont-do-sport/
August 25, 2013

 

young female babyAlexa Hill, aged 1. A future sports woman? I hope so!

 

“Girls at school would do the dangerous ‘fainting trick’ to avoid Physical Education. I won’t go into detail for fear of someone trying this but the action involved getting a couple of friends to push on a certain part of your body until you fainted – effectively slowing or stopping your heart for a second. It scared me then and it scares me even more now to remember how dangerous this was.” (Anon, August 2013)

 

As a female and a mother to another female (even though she is only 1), I can’t help but blog my mouth off about the issue of us girls and getting actively involved in sport and exercise. In this post, I hope to shed some light on why, in my experience and opinion, young women and children of the female gender, may be discouraged, embarrassed by and put off from doing exercise, especially if it’s called ‘sport’.

 

Gender-Typing

The main issue in my experience of life is parents. Whether we like it or not, some of us mums and dads are gender-typing our children. Boys are the active ones who will make money one day from sport, girls are the caring ones who like to look after babies and help mum around the house. I have a girl and a boy who are close in age and I admit, I’ve been guilty of gender-typing on the odd occasion – getting my little boy into football, buying my little girl a toy baby. Once my little girl is at walking age however, I’ll be actively encouraging her to try different sports, get outside and see exercise as fun.

At Home

I remember that as a young girl, I was exposed to very few sporting female role-models. That’s why Sally Gunnel became such a heroine to me, she was the only woman I saw achieve things in sport on TV. Apart from Sally, I cannot remember seeing a plethora of famous sporting females on the telly or in newspapers. This was reflected at home. My mother used to be fit and healthy because she did everything around the house and took us to the park regularly. She wasn’t involved in sport and rarely talked about it. There was no one else around me who was female and sporty. Even my dad wasn’t sporty, he still isn’t.

Education

At infant and junior school, I don’t recall seeing any females take part in sport. My twin sister and I were the first girls in our year to start playing football with the boys – many girls followed in our footsteps later.

Although I tried ballet and tap as a 5 year old and karate later on, I never understood why sport was important or what it could do for me. No-one at school taught me why sport was important and I was never encouraged to join a team of any kind. I knew as a child that I found sports games like football fun. Playing with the other children (or the boys), feeling like I was involved in something big, running around for ages and the rough and tumble of a childhood game of football were highly appealing to me. I never knew that there were girls football teams or girls teams for any other sports such as basketball, cricket, rounders…

Media

Everyone complains about media; about TV and reality shows, about the lack of female sport in the news. I agree that women need to be covered more widely in the news but that isn’t exactly going to attract younger participants now is it? We need to look at teen magazines, look at how girls are using social media, look at why girls are more engaged with what their friends are doing and posing in ‘selfies’ photos. If you’re young and you want to look good, exercise and eat well. There’s too much emphasis on young women being singers, models and just plain beautiful. There are millions of beautiful girls out there but the ones people remember are the ones who stand out from the crowd and achieve in sport or in great careers. Vying for public attention constantly does nothing for self-confidence.

Teenage girls

In my opinion, the problem with many teenage girls (like I was once) is that they lack so much self-confidence. At school as a teenager, I loved sprinting, I won every 100m and 200m race on sports day, without fail. I was in the Air Cadets…Which was the only institution to push my running further where I ran for my region and eventually my county. I was due to run a final race to be entered for the national championships when I fell down the stairs before school and banged my lower back meaning that I couldn’t run. That was the end to my running career, maybe I could have been running alongside Jess Ennis-Hill…

The point here is not what I achieved or didn’t achieve but the fact that I had to fight against low self-confidence and self-doubt just to go to training. This was ultimately my downfall, not the fall down the stairs. I was complacent because I didn’t want to go against the ‘norm’ of what my piers were doing after school. It’s only when you reach 28, have gotten married and have two kids that you realise the things that could have been.

The very few girls I knew at school (I can only count one in my class) who were into sports and achieved in sport were the confident ones. They were self-assured, organised and seemed generally a lot happier than my friends who were using the ‘fainting trick’ to avoid any exercise whatsoever. I was always in the middle, always wanted to take part but never wanted to take the next step. I had no confidence to do so.

Looking back, what I find most annoying is that teachers could see my potential but never tried to support me. I played hockey and scored goals but always felt like the spare part. I would never have even known to join professional sports clubs or had the confidence to ask.

In part-conclusion (as I’m sure I’ll be writing further blogs on this issue), I realise now that sport enables young women and girls to develop, to grow, to be comfortable in their surroundings and opens their lives up to opportunities and experience. I hope times have changed now in schools but in my experience, I had no help, no support and was mainly ignored by teachers.

As a parent now, I see how difficult it is to get children involved in sport – the cost, the time, the travel. This was initially why I set up http://www.funmefit.com, to help parents find ways to get their kids (and their girls) active and see what opportunities there are. Now though, I see that times need to change before more young women can feel encouraged enough to take part in sport. They need to know about the opportunities around them, encouraged that sport will help them stay young and healthy as they get older, help them make new friends and build self-confidence. I wish I could take the 14 year old me, shake her and say: ‘You can do it! Running is what you can do. Don’t worry if you get set back. Get off your backside and go to training. Keep trying!’

My daughter will not befall the same fate. It is my ambition to open doors for her, help her see how fun sport can be. Help her find what she’s good at, whether that be football, hockey, running, gymnastics, dancing, horse riding, basketball, skating, rounders, tennis or your less popular sports. Attitudes have to change all together, families have to change, the media has to change and girls themselves have to be given the confidence to try something new, take a chance. Don’t do the old ‘fainting trick’ to avoid PE!

 

This blog post was inspired by the recent BBC News article (22/08/2013)

Children need more exercise – especially girls, study says – by Nick Triggle.

 

This article was written by Kate Hill, Founder of FunMeFit.

Please contact info@funmefit.com

Fancy an Urban Challenge?

May 20, 2013 in Children & Play, Women

Urban Challenge

 

www.urban-challenge.co.uk

Sunday 7th July

We’ve recently partnered up with a new Sheffield event called Urban Challenge…Always up for a bit of a challenge, we had a look at it and decided that we’d quite like to support this event since it’s combining some sporting activity with serious family fun!

We are proud to have partnered with these great people and announce that we’ll be putting a team together and since it’s in July, it gives us enough time to recover from The Sheffield Half Marathon. If anyone would like to join Team FunMeFit at taking on the 5k obstacle course then please do get in touch! It’ll be a good photo opportunity and a chance to promote your business or organisation. We are yet to decide on a charity to fund-raise for but we’ll let everyone know in due course!

 

“What is Urban Challenge?

Urban Challenge is a 5km run but with a difference! Taking place on Sunday 7th July, not only will you be walking, running or jogging you will have to take on obstacles that will obstruct your path. Are you up for the challenge?”

(Taken from the Urban Challenge website, 2013).

 

That would be a yes! The 5k course is for the over 11’s and the 1k course is for families with children who are aged 3-11 years so there’s no excuse for you to come along and have some fun whilst flexing those muscles and getting that heart pounding! You can enter as a team or as an individual raising money for charity or just doing it for the fun. The venue for this event is the special SWFC stadium and Hillsborough Park.

Check out the website above and if you want to take part, there’s a 10% discount code on the homepage for admission to the event.

To be part of Team FunMeFit, contact Kate info@funmefit.com – looking forward to meeting all who want to take on the challenge!